Thugnotes—getting to know the classics?!

Thugnotes—getting to know the classics?!

thugnotes—Kristi Spuhler for LitLovers—
We know—it can be difficult to find excitement in a story whose first sentence is a paragraph. (A Tale of Two Cities, anyone?) Just looking at a sentence like that can make us go cross-eyed! For this reason (among others,) younger readers are not as quick to devour antiquated works.

Enter sites like (**Warning: The videos on this site contain some strong language**)

With modern lingo and a hip edginess, Dr. Sweets, (the moniker of comedian Greg Edwards,) takes well-known titles from the high school English classroom and breaks them down into bite-sized morsels fit to grab the attention of even the most attention-lacking reader. Distilling well-known titles down to their base elements, these video reviews break through the austere shell of many "classic" works and highlight the intrigue, violence, romance and excitement that many readers are seeking - but may not be able to find- in classic literature.

Using pop culture to interest audiences in classic stories isn’t a new idea. We highlighted a few examples of fine works that have been translated into movies in our last post (scroll down), and tv series like Wishbone filled roughly the same purpose to a younger audience. With the prevalence of vlogging* and social sharing sites, it seems that it was only a matter of time before literature would become a topic of conversation on these forums, too. As we should have suspected, the internet has allowed a number of unique interpretations to take hold.

What do you think about modernized video reviews of literature? Are they good for inspiring future LitHounds to explore the classics, or do these stylized versions detract from the original beauty of the work?

*video blog or video log


+1 #2 Happiness 2014-02-18 15:17
What would the authors of the featured classics say? If they were alive...

- Outrageous! They have stolen my idea!
- Great! More attention to my work and distribution of what I wanted to say.

Probably both and every answer in between. This is a difficult question.
+1 #1 june seghni 2014-02-13 19:17
You can't appreciate the beauty of the work if you don't read it, and if things like this get people to give the classics a go then I'm all for them. Sometimes there's a perception that the classics are boring but this series highlights what good stories they are..I'm a fan.

Site by BOOM Boom Supercreative

LitLovers © 2015