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From the publisher: “In 1968, a disillusioned and heartbroken Lillian Carlson left Atlanta after the assassination of Martin Luther King. She found meaning in the hearts of orphaned African children and cobbled together her own small orphanage in the Rift Valley alongside the lush forests of Rwanda.

“Three decades later, in New York City, Rachel Shepherd, lost and heartbroken herself, embarks on a journey to find the father who abandoned her as a young child, determined to solve the enigma of Henry Shepherd, a now-famous photographer.”

My desire to read about post-genocide Rwanda led me to this book. Unveiling the pain and pure evil endured by Rwandans through the lens of Americans, both present during the genocide and visiting in its aftermath, highlighted the chasms between the two cultures, but also a shared humanity.

Readers will appreciate a heightened perspective when comparing Rachel’s loss and struggles to the mass slaughter of an entire ethnic group. I left the book wanting to know more about current relations between the Hutus and Tutsis and now plan to read The Past Ahead by Gilbert Gatore, a Rwandan.

See our Reading Guide for In the Shadows of 10,000 HIlls.

 


Abby Fabiaschi
After working for years in technology, Abby turned to writing, and in 2017 her debut novel, I LIKED MY LIFE, was published by St. Martin’s Press. She’s also a human rights advocate, and when she’s not busy watching “the comedy show that is her children,” she manages to find time for one of her favorite activities, reading. Visit Abby’s website.

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