New England—Corn Fritters

 

Appetizercorn fritters

Corn Fritters
(Makes 8-12 pieces)

Delicious little morsels—used here as an appetizer, but try them as an accompaniment for fish or chowder.


2 C corn kernels (fresh or canned)
2 eggs
2 T flour
1 tsp. sugar
1 T butter (melted)
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 C oil

In a bowl, mix all ingredients, except oil. Heat oil a large skillet till it shimmers. Make small balls or patties of corn batter and cook in batches, about 3 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels. *

Serve immediately on a plate with toothpicks and a dipping sauce (or prepare them in advance and warm them up in a toaster oven before serving).

Serve with a bowl of warm maple syrup as a dip (try the sauce from Maple-Seared Scallops). Or make a chilled dip with equal parts mayonnaise and sour cream, plus some fresh chopped dill. 

* Depending on the amount of corn batter you use for each ball or patty, you should have 8-12 fritters.

| See more New England recipes |

Tips & Glossary

Bouquet Garni: (boo-kay gar-nee), a bundle of herbs tied together with string or wrapped in cheese cloth square. Usual herbs include parsley, thyme, and bay leaf, and peppercorns. They release their flavor during long cooking. Used to flavor soups and stews and removed before serving.

Ginger: dried ground ginger is far more potent than freshly grated from the root. Sweet dessert recipes call for ground powder. If you wish to use freshly grated ginger, use 6 times the amount of ground called for in the recipe. 

Nutmeg: Use small whole nuts and store them, tightly covered, in a dry dark area. Grate what you need using the smallest grating edge or grind in a food processor. What a difference from store bought nutmeg!

Piecrust: Store-bought versions are heaven-sent for those who have neither the time nor the know-how for good homemade piecrust. But for those willing to make their own, the payoff is great. See our recipe for Noel's Pie Crust.

 

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