Message

Error
  • Table './litlover_jo151/gztn_jxlabels_maps' is marked as crashed and should be repaired SQL=SELECT l.label_id, l.title, l.alias FROM gztn_jxlabels_labels AS l LEFT JOIN gztn_jxlabels_maps AS m ON m.label_id = l.label_id WHERE l.state = 1 AND m.item_id = 7975 AND m.type_id = 1 AND l.access <= 0 ORDER BY l.ordering ASC

Turkey—Lamb Kebabs & Yogurt

 

Turkish Entreelamb-kebabs

Lamb Kebabs & Yogurt
Yogortlu Kebab
(Serves 8)

Marinated lamb kebabs served served with a special yogurt-dill sauce.


Lamb & Marinade
2 medium onions (grated)
2 tsp. salt
2 1/2- 3 lb. lamb stew meat (1/2" cubes)
1/4 C olive oil
_________________

8 metal or wooden skewers (see sidebar)
4 medium tomatoes (wedges) or cherry tomatoes
_________________

Sauce & Garnish
2 C plain yogurt
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. fresh dill (chopped), or 1 tsp. dried
1 T oil


Marinade: combine grated onion with salt and let stand, covered, 20 minutes. In a food processor, puree onion with 4 T oil. Toss the lamb cubes in this mixture, place in a large bowl, cover, and let lamb marinate 1 hour.

Sauce & Garnish: in a small bowl, combine yogurt with salt and dill. Set aside. In a skillet, cook cubed tomatos in 1 T oil for 5 minutes over low heat. Set aside.

Assembly: prepare grill or broiler. Drain lamb from marinade and divide equally among 8 skewers. Alternate lamb cubes with tomatoes (keeing a 1/2" between each). Grill or broil kebabs, turning frequently, for about 10 minutes, to desired level of doneness.

Serve: Push meat and tomotoes off skewers and arrange on a platter or individual plates. (Or keep kebabs on the skewers for visual affect.) Spoon yogurt/dill sauce over all, or serve on the side.

| See more Turkish recipes |

Tips & Glossary

You may not have all the ingredients used in Turkish cooking on your spice shelf, but you'll find them at Middle-East food stores. To avoid frustration, make a list of items you need before trying out the recipes.

Cumin: an aromatic, kin to parsley and carrots; an important ingredient in chili powder. Used especially in Indian curries, as well as in Mid-Eastern, Mexican, and Asian dishes. It has an earthy, peppery flavor.

Filo: aka phyllo, paper-thin sheets of raw, unleavened flour dough. Buy frozen in any grocery store and follow directions on package for thawing. When working with one sheet, keep others covered with a damp towel to prevent drying out.

Peeled Tomatoes: choose 1 of 2 methods: 1) hold tomatoes one-at-a-time over gas flame till skin bubbles and becomes charred; 2) drop all tomatoes into pot of boiling water for 45 seconds. After either method, run tomatoes under running water; skins will slip off easily.

Roasted peppers: buy them prepared. Or make your own: place peppers under a broiler, or hold over a gas flame, till skin chars and blisters. Place them in a closed paper bag for 15-20 minutes (to steam them). When cool enough to handle, the skins slip off under running water.

Rosewater: distilled from rose petals and used to flavor Mid-Eastern and Asian cooking. You can make your own—but why? Purchase it at Mid-East or Asian or food stores.

Saffron: the most expensive spice in the world, from the crocus plant, and cultivated in Iran and Spain. Along with its unusual taste, it adds a deep rich yellow color to food. Use a strand or two at a time and soak in warm water before using.

Skewers: use metal or wooden skewers for kabobs. If wooden, be sure to soak them for 30 minutes before using to prevent them from catching on fire.

 

Site by BOOM Boom Supercreative

LitLovers © 2014